Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: A Mendelian randomisation study

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Abstract

Background: Observational studies suggest greater height is associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, but cannot exclude bias and/or confounding as explanations for this. Mendelian randomisation (MR) can provide evidence which may be less prone to bias. Methods: We pooled data from 39 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies (16,395 cases; 23,003 controls). We applied two-stage predictor-substitution MR, using a weighted genetic risk score combining 609 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted height and risk were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Greater genetically predicted height was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk overall (pooled-OR (pOR) = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01-1.11 per 5 cm increase in height), and separately for invasive (pOR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01-1.11) and borderline (pOR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.02-1.29) tumours. Conclusions: Women with a genetic propensity to being taller have increased risk of ovarian cancer. This suggests genes influencing height are involved in pathways promoting ovarian carcinogenesis.

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APA

Dixon-Suen, S. C., Nagle, C. M., Thrift, A. P., Pharoah, P. D. P., Ewing, A., Pearce, C. L., … Webb, P. M. (2018). Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: A Mendelian randomisation study. British Journal of Cancer, 118(8), 1123–1129. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-018-0011-3

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