Impressions of impression management: Evidence of spontaneous suspicion of ulterior motivation

16Citations
Citations of this article
50Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Many forms of self-presentational behavior are very common; so social perceivers are experienced at observing them. In contrast with existing views, we argue that inferences about ulterior, self-presentational motives may be formed as spontaneously as other trait inferences. Applying a relearning paradigm, we assessed implicit, spontaneous inferences about ulterior motives. Participants read behavior descriptions, some of which could imply ulterior motivation (e.g., "John volunteered to help paint his boss' house," which can imply "ingratiating," or the correspondent trait "helpful") and descriptions that could not ("John volunteered to help paint his friend's house"). We assessed spontaneous inferences about ulterior motives (e.g., ingratiating) and about traits that directly corresponded with the behavior (e.g., helpful). Results showed that participants spontaneously activated the ulterior motive just as much as the correspondent inference. This indicates co-occurring spontaneous inferences of ulterior motives as well as correspondent traits. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Ham, J., & Vonk, R. (2011). Impressions of impression management: Evidence of spontaneous suspicion of ulterior motivation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47(2), 466–471. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2010.12.008

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free