The prognostic role of systemic inflammatory markers on HIV-infected patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a multicenter cohort study

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Abstract

Background: The systemic inflammatory response has been postulated as having prognostic significance in a wide range of different cancer types. We aimed to assess the prognostic role of inflammatory markers on survival in HIV-infected patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), and to compute a prognostic score based on inflammatory biomarkers. Methods: We evaluated data on HIV patients with NLH diagnosis between 1998 and 2012 in a HIV Italian Cohort. Using Cox proportional regression model, we assessed the prognostic role of Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR), Platelet-Lymphocyte Ratio (PLR), Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), Prognostic Index (PI), and Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI). We also computed a risk score equation, assigning patients to a derivation and a validation sample. The area under the curve (AUC) was use to evaluate the predictive ability of this score. Results: 215 non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases (80.0% males) with a mean age of 43.2 years were included. Deaths were observed in 98 (45.6%) patients during a median follow up of 5 years. GPS, mGPS, PI and PNI were independently associated with risk of death. We also computed a mortality risk score which included PNI and occurrence of an AIDS event within six months from NHL diagnosis. The AUCs were 0.69 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.81) and 0.69 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.81) at 3 and 5 years of the follow-up, respectively. Conclusions: GPS, mGPS, PI and PNI are independent prognostic factors for survival of HIV patients with NHL.

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Raffetti, E., Donato, F., Castelnuovo, F., Ladisa, N., Paraninfo, G., Di Filippo, E., … Quiros-Roldan, E. (2015). The prognostic role of systemic inflammatory markers on HIV-infected patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a multicenter cohort study. Journal of Translational Medicine, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-015-0446-8

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