Reimagining Youth Justice: How the Dual Crises of COVID-19 and Racial Injustice Inform Judicial Policymaking and Reform

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Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic and the rejuvenated movement for racial justice in 2020 have presented an opportunity to reimagine the roles, practices, and policies of juvenile and family court systems actors. In order to capture contemporary ideas about judicial practice and policy reforms, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Hon. Edwina Mendelson, Deputy Chief Administrative Judge for the Office of Justice Initiatives in New York State, and Hon. Steven Teske, Chief Judge of the Juvenile Court of Clayton County, Georgia. These interviews yielded several recommendations for judicial reform in youth justice (e.g., implement court-wide procedural justice practices, improve accessibility using technology). These recommendations can be used by systems actors across the country, particularly those interested in adapting their courtroom practices for a post-pandemic world.

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Gagnon, A., & Alpern, S. (2021). Reimagining Youth Justice: How the Dual Crises of COVID-19 and Racial Injustice Inform Judicial Policymaking and Reform. Juvenile and Family Court Journal, 72(2), 5–22. https://doi.org/10.1111/jfcj.12196

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