Morphine Inhalation by Cancer Patients: A Comparison of Different Nebulization Techniques Using Pharmacokinetic, Spirometric, and Gasometric Parameters

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Abstract

Despite numerous case reports suggesting the value of morphine (M) nebulization in the treatment of breathlessness, only a few clinical trials have been able to support this. The reason for this could lie in the lack of understanding of the localization of opioid receptors in the airways and the biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics of nebulized morphine. In the present study, we compared two different methods of pneumodosimetric nebulization: the Bronchial Control Treatment System-Sidestream (BCTS-S) and the Bronchial Control Treatment System-Micro Cirrus (BCTS-MC). The first method delivers relatively large aerosol particles (2-5 μm) preferentially to the bronchial tree and trachea. In the BCTS-MC method, small aerosol particles (0.5-2 μm) mostly reach the alveoli. Ten patients with cancer were randomly assigned to either the BCTS-S or BCTS-MC inhalation of 5 mg morphine HCl. Patients using the BCTS-S method inhaled a morphine dose in 6.6 ± 2 minutes, whereas with the BCTS-MC method, the inhalation time was 28.8 ± 8 minutes. The areas under the curve of morphine and glucuronides were several times higher after BCTS-S than after BCTS-MC. The proportion of morphine-3-glucuronide to morphine-6-glucuronide (M6) was, on average, close to one for both methods. From the same amount of morphine in the BCTS-S method, five times more M6 was produced. In both methods, the time to maximum concentration for morphine metabolites was 20-40 minutes, much shorter than expected from oral, intranasal, or intravenous administration. The study shows that the method of inhalation may have a profound effect on the pharmacokinetics of morphine. It is possible that the lungs metabolize morphine to glucuronides themselves and in different proportions from those seen after systemic administration. The BCTS-S method was found to be potentially superior to the BCTS-MC method in local action in the lungs. © 2009 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.

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APA

Krajnik, M., Podolec, Z., Siekierka, M., Sykutera, M., Pufal, E., Sobanski, P., … Zylicz, Z. (2009). Morphine Inhalation by Cancer Patients: A Comparison of Different Nebulization Techniques Using Pharmacokinetic, Spirometric, and Gasometric Parameters. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 38(5), 747–757. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2009.03.008

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