Immunobiology of visceral leishmaniasis

88Citations
Citations of this article
195Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), commonly known as kala-azar, is caused by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum (Leishmania chagasi in the Americas). These Leishmania species infect macrophages throughout the viscera, and parasites are typically found in the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Patients with active disease typically exhibit marked immunosuppression, lack reactivity to the Leishmania skin test (LST), a delayed type hyper-sensitivity test, and their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) fail to respond when stimulated with leishmanial antigens in vitro. However, most people infected with visceralizing species of Leishmania never develop disease. Understanding immune failure and the underlying immune mechanism that lead to disease as well as control of infection are key questions for research in this field. In this review, we discuss immunological events described in human and experimental VL and how these can affect the outcome of infection. © 2012 Kumar and Nylén.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Kumar, R., & Nylén, S. (2012). Immunobiology of visceral leishmaniasis. Frontiers in Immunology. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2012.00251

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free