A television in the bedroom is associated with higher weekday screen time among youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD)

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Abstract

Objective: A TV in the bedroom has been associated with screen time in youth. Youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) have higher rates of screen time, but associations with bedroom TVs are unknown in this population. We examined the association of having a bedroom TV with screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD. Methods: Data were from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. Youth 6-17. years whose parent/guardian reported a physician's diagnosis of ADD/ADHD (n. =. 7024) were included in the analysis. Parents/guardians reported the presence of a bedroom TV and average weekday TV screen time. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models assessed the effects of a bedroom on screen time. Results: Youth with ADD/ADHD engaged in screen time with an average of 149.1. min/weekday and 59% had a TV in their bedroom. Adjusting for child and family characteristics, having a TV in the bedroom was associated with 25. minute higher daily screen time (95% CI: 12.8-37.4. min/day). A bedroom TV was associated with 32% higher odds of engaging in screen time for over 2. h/day (OR. =. 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0-1.7). Conclusion: Future research should explore whether removing TVs from bedrooms reduces screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD.

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APA

Lo, C. B., Waring, M. E., Pagoto, S. L., & Lemon, S. C. (2015). A television in the bedroom is associated with higher weekday screen time among youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD). Preventive Medicine Reports, 2, 1–3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2014.11.001

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