Naturally occurring polymorphisms of the mouse gammaretrovirus receptors CAT-1 and XPR1 alter virus tropism and pathogenicity

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Abstract

Gammaretroviruses of several different host range subgroups have been isolated from laboratory mice. The ecotropic viruses infect mouse cells and rely on the host CAT-1 receptor. The xenotropic/polytropic viruses, and the related human-derived XMRV, can infect cells of other mammalian species and use the XPR1 receptor for entry. The coevolution of these viruses and their receptors in infected mouse populations provides a good example of how genetic conflicts can drive diversifying selection. Genetic and epigenetic variations in the virus envelope glycoproteins can result in altered host range and pathogenicity, and changes in the virus binding sites of the receptors are responsible for host restrictions that reduce virus entry or block it altogether. These battleground regions are marked by mutational changes that have produced 2 functionally distinct variants of the CAT-1 receptor and 5 variants of the XPR1 receptor in mice, as well as a diverse set of infectious viruses, and several endogenous retroviruses coopted by the host to interfere with entry. © 2011 Christine A. Kozak.

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APA

Kozak, C. A. (2011). Naturally occurring polymorphisms of the mouse gammaretrovirus receptors CAT-1 and XPR1 alter virus tropism and pathogenicity. Advances in Virology. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/975801

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