Long-term indoramin therapy in congestive heart failure: A double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial

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Abstract

Twenty-one patients with moderately severe congestive heart failure participated in a double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of long-term (2 months) indoramin therapy on rest and exercise hemodynamics, exercise capacity and clinical status of patients with this clinical syndrome. The long-term administration of indoramin in patients (mean dose 50 mg every 12 hours) caused a mild reduction from baseline values in supine rest mean systemic blood pressure and, after dosing, elicited a significant reduction in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and heart rate as well as a mild increase in stroke volume. Longterm indoramin therapy caused a small decrease, as compared with baseline exercise responses, in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure at submaximal levels of exercise. It did not alter hemodynamic variables at maximal exercise, exercise capacity or overall clinical status, compared with findings at baseline or with placebo. © 1987, American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

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Leier, C. V., Binkley, P. F., Huss Randolph, P., & Unverferth, D. V. (1987). Long-term indoramin therapy in congestive heart failure: A double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 9(2), 426–432. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1097(87)80399-6

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