Urinary tract infection with Pasteurella multocida in a patient with cat exposure and abnormal urinary tract physiology: Case report and literature review

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Abstract

Pasteurella multocida is a gram-negative organism that commonly colonizes the mouth of cats and dogs, and is known to cause infection in humans associated with animal bites or scratches. Sites of infection other than skin and soft tissue are rare, but have been reported in patients with specific risk factors including anatomical abnormalities or immunosuppression. Herein, we report a case of a symptomatic urinary tract infection caused by P. multocida in a 59 year old female who presented to the hospital with complaints of systemic symptoms including malaise, rigors, and chills, as well as thick, malodorous urine. The patient self-catheterized multiple times daily due to urostomy with Kock pouch. Treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam followed by amoxicillin resulted in resolution of the infection.

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Costanzo, J. T., Wojciechowski, A. L., & Bajwa, R. P. S. (2017). Urinary tract infection with Pasteurella multocida in a patient with cat exposure and abnormal urinary tract physiology: Case report and literature review. IDCases, 9, 109–111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idcr.2017.07.002

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