A Peer-Led Pulse-based Nutrition Education Intervention Improved School-Aged Children’s Knowledge, Attitude, Practice (KAP) and Nutritional Status in Southern Ethiopia

  • Dargie F
  • Henry C
  • Hailemariam H
  • et al.
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Abstract

Background: Peer-led nutrition education intervention on promoting locally available pulses among school-aged children could be one strategy to overcome child malnutrition in poor communities. Objectives: This study was aimed at assessing the effect of a peer-led pulse nutrition education intervention on knowledge, attitude, practice of pulse consumption and nutritional status among 202 school children.Methods: School based randomized controlled trial was conducted among 202 (101 control and 101 cases). School age children were selected from the two groups using simple random sampling technique. Baseline data were collected from 1st May to 15th May, 2016. Six month peer led nutrition intervention was provided for the study subjects. Pre-test, post-test and anthropometric measurements (weight and height) were conducted at baseline and end of the intervention. Statistical tests such as independent two samples t-test were employed. World Health Organization (WHO) Anthrop Plus software version 1.0.4 was used to calculate anthropometric indices. Results: The mean diet diversity score was significantly (P<0.001) improved from 2.78 (0.96) to 3.60 (1.10) after a six month intervention in the intervention group. The independent two samples t-test showed significant differences (p<0.001) in knowledge, attitude and practice mean scores of school age children about pulse preparation and consumption. There was no significant difference in nutritional status: BAZ (p=0.774) and HAZ (p=0.516) of school age children between the intervention and control groups at baseline. Post-intervention showed significant (p=0.01) differences between intervention and control schools in BAZ mean score of the children which was reflected in significantly (P<0.001) decreased prevalence of thinnessConclusion: The study concluded that peer led education strategy provides an opportunity to reduce malnutrition and its impacts if properly designed, including the use of behavioural change mode. 

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APA

Dargie, F., Henry, C. J., Hailemariam, H., & Geda, N. R. (2018). A Peer-Led Pulse-based Nutrition Education Intervention Improved School-Aged Children’s Knowledge, Attitude, Practice (KAP) and Nutritional Status in Southern Ethiopia. Journal of Food Research, 7(3), 38. https://doi.org/10.5539/jfr.v7n3p38

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