Triticale improvement for forage and cover crop uses in the southern great plains of the United States

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Abstract

Triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) is a man-made species developed by crossing wheat (Triticum spp.) and rye (Secale cereale L.). It incorporates favorable alleles from both progenitor species (wheat and rye), enabling adaptation to environments that are less favorable for wheat yet providing better biomass yield and forage quality. Triticale has huge potential for both grain and forage production, though research to improve the crop for better adaptation and grain quality is lagging behind that of other small grains. It is also gaining popularity as a cover crop to improve soil health and reduce nutrient leaching. Because of its genetic and flower structure, triticale is suitable for both line and hybrid breeding methods. Advances in the areas of molecular biology and the wealth of genomic resources from both wheat and rye can be exploited for triticale improvement. Gene mapping and genomic selection will facilitate triticale breeding by increasing selection precision and reducing time and cost. The objectives of this review are to summarize current triticale production status, breeding, and genetics research achievements and to highlight gaps for future research.

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Ayalew, H., Kumssa, T. T., Butler, T. J., & Ma, X. F. (2018, August 6). Triticale improvement for forage and cover crop uses in the southern great plains of the United States. Frontiers in Plant Science. Frontiers Media S.A. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.01130

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