Oceanic archipelagos: A perspective on the geodynamics and biogeography of the World's smallest biotic provinces

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Abstract

Since the contributions of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, oceanic archipelagos have played a central role in the development of biogeography. However, despite the critical influence of oceanic islands on ecological and evolutionary theory, our focus has remained limited to either the island-level of specific archipelagos or single archipelagos. Recently, it was proposed that oceanic archipelagos qualify as biotic provinces, with diversity primarily reflecting a balance between speciation and extinction, with colonization having a minor role. Here we focus on major attributes of the archipelagic geological dynamics that can affect diversity at both the island and the archipelagic level. We also reaffirm that oceanic archipelagos are appropriate spatiotemporal units to frame analyses in order to understand large scale patterns of biodiversity.

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Triantis, K. A., Whittaker, R. J., Fernández-Palacios, J. M., & Geist, D. J. (2016). Oceanic archipelagos: A perspective on the geodynamics and biogeography of the World’s smallest biotic provinces. Frontiers of Biogeography. eScholarship. https://doi.org/10.21425/f5fbg29605

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