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Communication With Colleagues: Frequency of Collaboration Regarding Physical Health of Consumers With Mental Illness

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Abstract

Purpose: To identify how frequently nurses in mental health services communicate about physical health of consumers with other healthcare professionals, and whether such collaboration is associated with physical care actions with consumers. Design and Methods: An online national Australian survey of nurses in mental health services. Findings: Nurses discuss physical health frequently with general practitioners, psychiatrists, and case managers, and less frequently with occupational therapists, social workers, and nurse practitioners. Interprofessional attention was positively associated with direct physical health care such as clinical screening and health education. Practice Implications: Interprofessional communication may support nurses in direct physical healthcare actions with consumers. Increasing collaborations with nurse practitioners, social workers, and occupational therapists need to be explored as part of clinical teamwork development. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Happell, B., Platania-Phung, C., Scott, D., & Nankivell, J. (2014). Communication With Colleagues: Frequency of Collaboration Regarding Physical Health of Consumers With Mental Illness. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 50(1), 33–43. https://doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12021

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