The Effects of Nocturnally Administered Stimulant Medication on EEG Sleep and Behavior in Hyperactive Children

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Abstract

Insomia has been known to be one of the side effects of stimulant drug therapy in children. Surprisingly, children who had been diagnosed to have an attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, and who had presented daytime behavioral problems and sleeping difficulties as well, had clinically responded well to morning, afternoon and evening doses of dextroamphetamine capsules. In seven of these children, the effect of nocturnally administered dextroamphetamine upon EEG sleep was studied by a double-blind crossover method. Significant effects were obtained for six sleep parameters. During the drug condition, the EEG showed a significant shift in sleep architecture with a market increase of sleep stages 1 and 2 and a corresponding decrease in REM sleep, sleep stages 3 and 4 (deep sleep) remaining unchanged. There was a marked delay of the first REM period (REM latency), a decrease in percentage of REM sleep and the number of REM periods, which might account for less disruption of sleep by dreaming. There was also a slight decrease of overall sleeping time (sleep efficiency). © 1983, The American Academy of Child Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

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CHATOOR, I., WELLS, K. C., CONNERS, C. K., SEIDEL, W. T., & SHAW, D. (1983). The Effects of Nocturnally Administered Stimulant Medication on EEG Sleep and Behavior in Hyperactive Children. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 22(4), 337–342. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-7138(09)60668-3

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