A trans fatty acid substitute enhanced development of liver proliferative lesions induced in mice by feeding a choline-deficient, methionine-lowered, L-amino acid-defined, high-fat diet

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Abstract

Background: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a form of liver disease characterized by steatosis, necroinflammation, and fibrosis, resulting in cirrhosis and cancer. Efforts have focused on reducing the intake of trans fatty acids (TFAs) because of potential hazards to human health and the increased risk for NASH. However, the health benefits of reducing dietary TFAs have not been fully elucidated. Here, the effects of TFAs vs. a substitute on NASH induced in mice by feeding a choline-deficient, methionine-lowered, L-amino acid-defined, high-fat diet (CDAA-HF) were investigated. Methods: Mice were fed CDAA-HF containing shortening with TFAs (CDAA-HF-T(+)), CDAA-HF containing shortening without TFAs (CDAA-HF-T(−)), or a control chow for 13 or 26 weeks. Results: At week 13, NASH was induced in mice by feeding CDAA-HF-T(+) containing TFAs or CDAA-HF-T(−) containing no TFAs, but rather mostly saturated fatty acids (FAs), as evidenced by elevated serum transaminase activity and liver changes, including steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. CDAA-HF-T(−) induced a greater extent of hepatocellular apoptosis at week 13. At week 26, proliferative (preneoplastic and non-neoplastic) nodular lesions were more pronounced in mice fed CDAA-HF-T(−) than CDAA-HF-T(+). Conclusions: Replacement of dietary TFAs with a substitute promoted the development of proliferation lesions in the liver of a mouse NASH model, at least under the present conditions. Attention should be paid regarding use of TFA substitutes in foods for human consumption, and a balance of FAs is likely more important than the particular types of FAs.

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Suzuki-Kemuriyama, N., Abe, A., Uno, K., Ogawa, S., Watanabe, A., Sano, R., … Nakae, D. (2020). A trans fatty acid substitute enhanced development of liver proliferative lesions induced in mice by feeding a choline-deficient, methionine-lowered, L-amino acid-defined, high-fat diet. Lipids in Health and Disease, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12944-020-01423-3

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