Sleep quality and paranoia: The role of alexithymia, negative emotions and perceptual anomalies

6Citations
Citations of this article
47Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that sleep problems are associated with psychotic like experiences including paranoia. However, the mechanisms underpinning this association are not well understood and thus studies modelling hypothesised mediating factors are required. Alexithymia, the inability to recognise and describe emotions within the self may be an important candidate. In two separate studies we sought to investigate factors mediating the relationship between sleep quality and paranoia using a cross-sectional design. Healthy volunteers without a mental health diagnosis were recruited (study 1, N = 401, study 2, N = 402). Participants completed a series of measures assessing paranoia, negative emotions, alexithymia and perceptual anomalies in an online survey. In study 1, regression and mediation analyses showed that the relationship between sleep quality and paranoia was partially mediated by alexithymia, perceptual anomalies and negative affect. In contrast, study 2 found that the relationship between sleep quality and paranoia was fully mediated by negative affect, alexithymia and perceptual anomalies. The link between sleep quality and paranoia is unclear and reasons for discrepant results are discussed. Novel findings in this study include the link between alexithymia and paranoia.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Rehman, A., Gumley, A., & Biello, S. (2018). Sleep quality and paranoia: The role of alexithymia, negative emotions and perceptual anomalies. Psychiatry Research, 259, 216–222. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.066

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free