Absence of P-Selectin in Recipients of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation Ameliorates Experimental Graft-versus-Host Disease

  • Lu S
  • Holland A
  • Na I
  • et al.
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Abstract

Alloreactive T cells are crucial for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) pathophysiology, and modulating their trafficking patterns has been efficacious in ameliorating experimental disease. We report in this paper that P-selectin, a glycoprotein found on resting and inflamed endothelium, is important for donor alloreactive T cells trafficking into GVHD target organs, such as the intestines and skin. Compared with wild-type (WT) recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, P-selectin -/- recipients exhibit decreased GVHD mortality and decreased GVHD of the skin, liver, and small bowels. This was associated with diminished in-filtration of alloactivated T cells into the Peyer's patches and small bowels, coupled with increased numbers of donor T cells in the spleen and secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Surprisingly, however, donor T cells deficient for P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1, the most well described P-selectin ligand, mediated GVHD similar to WT T cells and accumulated in SLO and target organs in similar numbers as WT T cells. This suggests that P-selectin may be required for trafficking into inflamed tissues but not SLO and that donor T cells may use multiple P-selectin ligands apart from P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 to interact with P-selectin and traffic into inflamed tissues during GVHD. We conclude that targeting P-selectin may be a viable strategy for GVHD prophylaxis or treatment. Copyright © 2010 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

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APA

Lu, S. X., Holland, A. M., Na, I.-K., Terwey, T. H., Alpdogan, O., Bautista, J. L., … van den Brink, M. R. M. (2010). Absence of P-Selectin in Recipients of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation Ameliorates Experimental Graft-versus-Host Disease. The Journal of Immunology, 185(3), 1912–1919. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0903148

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