Explaining academic success in engineering degree programs: Do female and male students differ?

32Citations
Citations of this article
96Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Background: In Dutch engineering education, female students outperform male students. Using an interactionalist framework, this study explores factors that contribute to this gender-based difference. Purpose: This study aims to answer two questions: Do female and male students differ in background characteristics, engagement factors, and academic success? Are differences in the relationships among background characteristics, engagement factors, and academic success gender-specific? Design/method: Data on male and female engineering undergraduate students from five Dutch universities were subjected to linear structural modeling to compare potential gender differences in the relationships among the focal variables. Two structural models were considered. Results: Female students spent more time on independent study, reported more social integration, completed more credits, and were more likely to stay in engineering than were male students. Academic integration and intention to persist were important for completion of credits for both genders. Social integration was only important for men's academic success. Females seemed to benefit less from good preparation through active learning during secondary education, and the effect of a high grade point average on math was negative for females but positive for males. Conclusions: Interactionalist concepts can explain academic success, but the relationships among concepts vary by gender. Males' intentions to persist in engineering are an outcome of engagement processes during the first year, whereas females' intentions to persist in engineering are manifest at the start of the first year.

Author supplied keywords

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Kamphorst, J. C., Adriaan Hofman, W. H., Jansen, E. P. W. A., & Terlouw, C. (2015). Explaining academic success in engineering degree programs: Do female and male students differ? Journal of Engineering Education, 104(2), 189–211. https://doi.org/10.1002/jee.20071

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free