Smoking, season, and detection of chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in clinically stable COPD patients

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Abstract

Background: The prevalence and role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain unclear. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 100 outpatients with smoking-related, clinically stable COPD, and induced sputum was obtained in 62 patients. Results: Patients had mean age (standard deviation) of 65.8 (10.7) years, mean forced expiratory volume in one second of 1.34 (0.61) L, and 61 (61.0%) were male. C. pneumoniae nucleic acids were detected by nested polymerase chain reaction in 27 (27.0%). Current smoking (odds ratio {OR} = 2.6, 95% confidence interval CI: 1.1, 6.6, P = 0.04), season (November to April) (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.4, 9.2, P = 0.007), and chronic sputum production (OR = 6.4, 95% CI: 1.8, 23.2, P = 0.005) were associated with detection of C. pneumoniae DNA. Conclusions: Prospective studies are needed to examine the role of C. pneumoniae nucleic acid detection in COPD disease symptoms and progression. © 2002 Smieja et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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Smieja, M., Leigh, R., Petrich, A., Chong, S., Kamada, D., Hargreave, F. E., … Mahony, J. B. (2002). Smoking, season, and detection of chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in clinically stable COPD patients. BMC Infectious Diseases, 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-2-12

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