Timed up and go: Reference values for community-dwelling older adults with and without arthritis and non-communicable diseases: The Tromsø study

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Abstract

Purpose: The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is used to assess a person’s mobility and balance. We aimed to provide updated reference values for TUG performance for the community-dwelling older population according to age and sex, and according to the presence of arthritis and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Participants and Methods: Cross-sectional data from the seventh wave (2015–2016) of the population-based Norwegian Tromsø Study counting 5400 community-dwelling people (53% women), aged 60–84 years were used. Reference values were presented as percentiles and means for men and women by age at five-year intervals. Results: Median TUG score was stable during age 60–65 years, and after age 65 years median TUG score increased significantly with age (increase by 0.14 sec per 1 year higher age in both men and women, p<0.001). At the youngest ages (<65 years), in both men and women, there were no differences in TUG performance for those with NCD or arthritis compared to those without these diseases. After age 65 however, those without these diseases performed significantly better (p<0.05) in both men and women. Conclusion: The present study provided percentile reference values for TUG performance in community-dwelling older adults in Norway by age and sex, and in subgroups of those having arthritis and NCDs. TUG scores increased with age, and performance was significantly poorer among participants with arthritis or NCDs after age 65 years. The findings may guide clinical interventions for individuals with mobility and balance disabilities.

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Svinøy, O. E., Hilde, G., Bergland, A., & Strand, B. H. (2021). Timed up and go: Reference values for community-dwelling older adults with and without arthritis and non-communicable diseases: The Tromsø study. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 16, 335–343. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S294512

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