Combining Split-Beam and Dual-Frequency Identification Sonars to Estimate Abundance of Anadromous Fishes in the Roanoke River, North Carolina

12Citations
Citations of this article
28Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

You may have access to this PDF.

Abstract

Abstract: Riverine hydroacoustic techniques are an effective method for evaluating abundance of upstream migrating anadromous fishes. To use these methods in the Roanoke River, North Carolina, at a wide site with uneven bottom topography, we used a combination of split-beam sonar and dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) deployments. We aimed a split-beam sonar horizontally to monitor midchannel and near-bottom zones continuously over the 3-month spring monitoring periods in 2010 and 2011. The DIDSON was rotated between seven cross-channel locations (using a vertical aim) and nearshore regions (using horizontal aims). Vertical deployment addressed blind spots in split-beam coverage along the bottom and provided reliable information about the cross-channel and vertical distributions of upstream migrants. Using a Bayesian framework, we modeled sonar counts within four cross-channel strata and apportioned counts by species using species proportions from boat electrofishing and gill netting. Modeled estimates (95% credible intervals [CIs]) of total upstream migrants in 2010 and 2011 were 2.5 million (95% CI, 2.4–2.6 million) and 3.6 million (95% CI, 3.4–3.9 million), respectively. Results indicated that upstream migrants are extremely shore- and bottom-oriented, suggesting nearshore DIDSON monitoring improved the accuracy and precision of our estimates. This monitoring protocol and model may be widely applicable to river systems regardless of their cross-sectional width or profile. Received July 16, 2014; accepted November 21, 2014

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Hughes, J. B., & Hightower, J. E. (2015). Combining Split-Beam and Dual-Frequency Identification Sonars to Estimate Abundance of Anadromous Fishes in the Roanoke River, North Carolina. North American Journal of Fisheries Management, 35(2), 229–240. https://doi.org/10.1080/02755947.2014.992558

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free