Injuries from falls by older adults in long-term care captured on video: Prevalence of impacts and injuries to body parts

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Abstract

Background: Falls are the leading cause of injuries in older adults. However, most falls in older adults do not cause serious injury, suggesting that older adults may fall in a manner that reduces the likelihood of impact to body sites that are most vulnerable to injury. In this observational study of falls in long-term care (LTC), we tested whether body parts differed in their probability of impact and injury. Methods: We recorded and analyzed videos of 2388 falls by 658 LTC residents (mean age 84.0 (SD = 8.1); 56.4% female). We used Linear Mixed Models to test for differences between body parts in the probability of impact and injury, and injury when impacts occurred. Results: Injuries were reported in 38.2% of falls, and 85.9% of injuries involved direct impact to the injured body part. Impact occurred most often to the hip/pelvis (probability (standard error) = 0.95 (0.01); p

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Komisar, V., Dojnov, A., Yang, Y., Shishov, N., Chong, H., Yu, Y., … Robinovitch, S. N. (2022). Injuries from falls by older adults in long-term care captured on video: Prevalence of impacts and injuries to body parts. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-022-03041-3

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