Copper-oxide spinel absorber coatings for high-temperature concentrated solar power systems

11Citations
Citations of this article
36Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), a promising renewable energy technology, involves methods to concentrate the sun's energy onto receiver systems that generate steam, activate turbines, and consequently generate electrical power. To ensure CSP technologies remain cost-competitive, absorber coatings on CSP receiver systems require performance enhancements for increasing solar-thermal energy conversion efficiency. In this work, black metal-oxide nanoparticles comprising copper-cobalt oxides (CuxCo3−xO4) and copper-manganese oxides (CuxMn3−xO4) are synthesized for solar absorptive potential by hydrothermal syntheses – selected for low-cost, energy-efficient fabrication capable for bulk manufacturability. The material is deposited onto high-temperature, durable Inconel substrates by a flexible spray-coating method, and characterization is performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) analyses, as well as measurements to gauge thermal performance. High temperature stability of a model solar receiver surface using these synthesized materials are assessed by comparing spectral reflectance and a figure-of-merit efficiency metric before and after high temperature exposure beyond 1000 h. To extend spectrally-selective absorbance capability, the coating surfaces are geometrically-textured using sacrificial polymer beads that are jointly implemented in the spray-coating process. This study ultimately showcases materials produced with high figure-of-merit conversion efficiency, demonstrating solar absorber coatings capable of interfacing with next-generation CSP receiver systems.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Karas, D. E., Byun, J., Moon, J., & Jose, C. (2018). Copper-oxide spinel absorber coatings for high-temperature concentrated solar power systems. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 182, 321–330. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solmat.2018.03.025

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free