Acceptability of a lifelogging wearable camera in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: A mixed-method study

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Abstract

Background: The main objective of this research was to evaluate the acceptance of technology based on a wearable lifelogging camera in a sample of older adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: A mixed-method design was used, consisting of a self-report questionnaire, numerous images taken by users, and a series of focus group discussions. The patients were involved in an individualized training programme. Results: Nine MCI patients and their caregiver relatives were included. They showed good acceptance of the camera and downloaded an appropriate number of images on a daily basis. Perceived severity and ease of use were the main factors associated with the intention to use the device. Conclusions: Older adults with MCI can become competent users of lifelogging wearable cameras with a good level of acceptance. Privacy concerns are outweighed by the potential benefits for memory. Limitations, strengths and implications for future research are discussed.

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Gelonch, O., Ribera, M., Codern-Bové, N., Ramos, S., Quintana, M., Chico, G., … Garolera, M. (2019). Acceptability of a lifelogging wearable camera in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: A mixed-method study. BMC Geriatrics, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-019-1132-0

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