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Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections due to AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae: An active surveillance cohort in a large centralized Canadian region

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Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae (AE) in a large centralized Canadian region over a 9-year period. Methods: An active surveillance cohort design in Calgary, Canada. Results: A cohort of 458 episodes of BSIs caused by AE was assembled for analysis. The majority of infections were of nosocomial origin with unknown sources. Enterobacter spp. was the most common species while BSIs due to Serratia spp. had a significant higher mortality when compared to other AE. Delays in empiric or definitive antibiotic therapy were not associated with a difference in outcome. However, patients that did not receive any empiric antimicrobial therapy had increased mortality (3/5; 60% vs. 57/453; 13%; p = 0.018) as did those that did not receive definitive therapy (6/17; 35% vs. 54/441; 12%; p = 0.015). Conclusions: Delays in therapy were not associated with adverse outcomes although lack of active therapy was associated with increased mortality. A strategy for BSIs due to AE where β-lactam antibiotics (including oxyiminocephalosporins) are used initially followed by a switch to non-β-lactam antibiotics once susceptibility results are available is effective.

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Chaubey, V. P., Pitout, J. D. D., Dalton, B., Gregson, D. B., Ross, T., & Laupland, K. B. (2014). Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections due to AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae: An active surveillance cohort in a large centralized Canadian region. BMC Infectious Diseases, 14(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-014-0647-4

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