Initial ten years of experience with the intravitreal dexamethasone implant: A retrospective chart review

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the initial ten years of results from the intravitreal dexamethasone implant (DEX) in patients treated for retinal vein occlusion (RVO), diabetic macular edema (DME) or uveitis. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients receiving DEX since its FDA approval. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT) on optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure and cataract status were collected. Baseline data were collected from the initial DEX and post-treatment data at the visit at least four weeks after the last DEX. Results: In total, 315 eyes received 1216 DEX over 63.9±4.6 weeks. In the branch RVO (n=90), central RVO (n=59) and DME (n=62) cohorts, BCVA improved significantly (p<0.05). The uveitis (n=154) cohort did not have a significant change in BCVA, 0.62 ±0.04 to 0.61±0.04 logMAR (p=0.34). Younger patients, vitrectomized eyes, and eyes without a history of glaucoma were associated with significantly better BCVA outcomes in the uveitis cohort (p<0.05). Overall, CMT decreased significantly from 376.6±6.8 to 322.7±5.0 µm (p<0.05). Intraocular pressure increased significantly (p<0.001) and the percentage of patients requiring anti-glaucoma medications increased from 33.0% to 67.6%. Of phakic eyes, 58.8% (n=63) had cataract progression or underwent surgery with those who underwent surgery experiencing a significant improvement in BCVA (p<0.05). Conclusion: Repeated DEX over extended follow-up offers significant anatomic benefits to all cohorts. Visual benefits are only seen in RVO, DME and select uveitis demographics.

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Wallsh, J., Luths, C., Kil, H., & Gallemore, R. (2020). Initial ten years of experience with the intravitreal dexamethasone implant: A retrospective chart review. Clinical Ophthalmology, 14, 3097–3108. https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S264559

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