Skip to main content

The advantage of mixing examples in inductive learning: a comparison of three hypotheses

6Citations
Citations of this article
25Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This artice is free to access.

Abstract

Mixing examples of different categories (interleaving) has been shown to promote inductive learning as compared with presenting examples of the same category together (massing). In three studies, we tested whether the advantage of interleaving is exclusively due to the mixing of examples from different categories or to the temporal gap introduced between presentations. In addition, we also tested the role of working memory capacity (WMC). Results showed that the mixing of examples might be the key component that determines improved induction. WMC might also be involved in the interleaving effect: participants with high spans seemed to profit more than participants with low spans from interleaved presentations. Our findings have relevant implications for education. Practice schedules should be individually customised so society as a whole can profit from differences between learners.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Guzman-Munoz, F. J. (2017). The advantage of mixing examples in inductive learning: a comparison of three hypotheses. Educational Psychology, 37(4), 421–437. https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2015.1127331

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free