Morphometric and genetic differentiation among populations of Eupemphix nattereri (Amphibia, Anura, Leiuperidae) from central Brazil

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Abstract

To assess genetic structure and phenotypic diversity of Eupemphix nattereri Steindachner, 1863, morphometric and molecular analyses were carried out for nine populations from the State of Goiás. A total of 11 morphometric traits were evaluated and genetic information was estimated using RAPD markers. Genetic and phenotypic distances were determined as a function of geographical origin. Correlation among genetic, morphometric, micro, and macroenviromental were analyzed by the Mantel test. Genetic data indicated high levels of genetic diversity (st=0.3) among the nine populations. Mantel tests did not reveal a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographical distances, indicating that locally geographical populations were not genetically similar, even in distances smaller than 50 km. Discriminant analysis on 11 morphometric measurements showed a high divergence among the nine populations. However, a marginally significant correlation (P=0.08) between genetic and morphometric distances was found. The observed correlation was not causal in terms of the relationship between phenotype and genotype, but indicated common spatial structures. Thus, our results suggest that isolation-by-distance processes may explain population divergence in Eupemphix nattereri.

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e Silva, D. de M., da Cruz, A. D., Bastos, R. P., Telles, M. P. de C., & Diniz-Filho, J. A. F. (2008). Morphometric and genetic differentiation among populations of Eupemphix nattereri (Amphibia, Anura, Leiuperidae) from central Brazil. Iheringia - Serie Zoologia, 98(4), 493–500. https://doi.org/10.1590/s0073-47212008000400013

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