Marked attenuation of the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potentials after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine: A case report

1Citations
Citations of this article
9Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This artice is free to access.

Abstract

Background: It is believed that ketamine does not affect motor-evoked potential amplitude, whereas various anesthetic drugs attenuate the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potential. However, we encountered a patient with marked attenuation of motor-evoked potential amplitude after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine. Case presentation: A 15-year-old Japanese girl with a diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was admitted to our hospital to undergo posterior spinal fusion at T4-L3. After induction of general anesthesia using a continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil, we confirmed that transcranial electrical motor-evoked potentials were being recorded correctly. Ketamine 1.25 mg/kg was administered intravenously for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. About 3 minutes later, the motor-evoked potential amplitude was markedly attenuated. No other drugs were administered except for ketamine. The patient's vital signs were stable, and the surgery had not yet started. The motor-evoked potential amplitude was recovered at about 6 minutes after administration of ketamine. The surgery was performed uneventfully, and the patient had no neurologic deficit when she emerged from general anesthesia. Conclusions: Although there is a widely held belief in the field of anesthesiology that ketamine does not affect motor-evoked potential amplitude, it has been suggested that ketamine could affect its monitoring.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Furutani, K., Matsuhashi, M., Deguchi, H., Mitsuma, Y., Ohashi, N., & Baba, H. (2018). Marked attenuation of the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potentials after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine: A case report. Journal of Medical Case Reports, 12(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-018-1741-9

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free