Influence of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibre on drying shrinkage in restrained lightweight foamed mortar

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Abstract

Currently, the attention on natural fibre reinforced concrete based materials could be seen increasingly rising around the world in the quest for economic and environmental importance in the construction sector and built environment. Hence this research will focus on inclusion of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibre on drying shrinkage of lightweight foamed mortar (LFM). There were three densities of LFM was considered which were 800kg/m³, 1100kg/m³ and 1400kg/m³.The size for the empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibre was between 15-19mm with diverse volume fractions of 0.15%, 0.30%, 0.45% and 0.60% by LFM mix volume. The drying shrinkage test was performed according to American Standard ASTM C157. The test specimen dimension is a 75mm x 75mm x 275 mm prism shaped utilising a standard stainless mould which conforms to ASTM C490. The experimental results revealed that the inclusion of 0.3% EFB fibre in 800 kg/m3 density, 0.45% EFB fibre in 800 kg/m3 and 1400 kg/m3 densities possess the lowest percentage value of drying shrinkage at the final age of testing compared to control specimen and other EFB fibre volume fraction. In addition, EFB fibre exhibits a micrometer level diameter and hydrophilicity attributes which make it highly dispersible. It also has a capability to be distributed homogeneously along with the synchronicity of a great fibres quantity in unit volume of LFM.

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APA

Musa, M., Othuman Mydin, M. A., & Abdul Ghani, A. N. (2019). Influence of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibre on drying shrinkage in restrained lightweight foamed mortar. International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, 8(10), 4533–4538. https://doi.org/10.35940/ijitee.J1080.0881019

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