Characterization of siderophores from Escherichia coli strains through genome mining tools: an antiSMASH study

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Abstract

Although urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect many people, they are usually a disease observed in women. UTIs happen when exogenous and endogenous bacteria enter the urinary tract and colonize there. Cystitis and pyelonephritis occur when bacteria infect the bladder and the kidneys, respectively. UTIs become much serious if the bacteria causing the infection are antibiotic resistant. Since the pathogenic microorganisms have been adopted to current antibiotics via genetic variations, UTIs have become an even more severe health problem. Therefore, there is a great need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. Genome mining of nonpathogenic and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains for investigating secondary metabolites were conducted by the antiSMASH analysis. When the resulting secondary metabolites were examined, it was found that some of the siderophores are effective in UTIs. In conclusion, since the siderophore production in E. coli is directly related to UTIs, these molecules can be a good target for development of future pharmaceutical approaches and compounds. Siderophores can also be used in industrial studies due to their higher chelating affinity for iron. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

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APA

Cavas, L., & Kirkiz, I. (2022). Characterization of siderophores from Escherichia coli strains through genome mining tools: an antiSMASH study. AMB Express, 12(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13568-022-01421-x

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