Long-term Effect of Intraocular Lens vs Contact Lens Correction on Visual Acuity after Cataract Surgery during Infancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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Abstract

Importance: Although intraocular lenses (IOLs) are often implanted in children, little is known whether primary IOL implantation or aphakia and contact lens correction results in better long-term visual outcomes after unilateral cataract surgery during infancy. Objective: To compare long-term visual outcomes with contact lens vs IOL correction following unilateral cataract surgery during infancy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter randomized clinical trial enrolled 114 infants with a unilateral congenital cataract who underwent cataract surgery with or without primary IOL implantation between 1 and 6 months of age. Data on long-term visual outcomes were collected when the children were age 10.5 years (July 14, 2015, to July 12, 2019) and analyzed from March 30 through August 6, 2019. Interventions: Intraocular lens implantation at the time of cataract surgery. Main Outcomes and Measures: Best-corrected visual acuity using the electronic Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (E-ETDRS) testing protocol. Analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: Best-corrected visual acuity was measured at age 10.5 years for 110 of the 114 patients (96%) enrolled as infants. The participants included 58 girls (53%) and 52 boys (47%). Overall, 27 of the children (25%) had good (logMAR 0.30 [Snellen equivalent, 20/40] or better) visual acuity in the treated eye (12 [22%] in the IOL group and 15 [27%] in the aphakia group), but 50 children (44%) had a visual acuity of logMAR 1.00 (Snellen equivalent, 20/200) or worse (25 [44%] in the IOL group and 25 [44%] in the aphakia group). The median logMAR acuity in the treated eye was similar in children randomized to receive an IOL at the time of cataract extraction (0.89; interquartile range [IQR], 0.33-1.43 [Snellen equivalent, 20/159]) and those who remained aphakic (0.86; IQR, 0.30-1.46 [Snellen equivalent, 20/145]) (IQR, 0.30-1.46; P =.82). Although the overall difference in median visual acuity between the 2 groups was small, the estimate was imprecise (99% CI for the difference in medians was-0.54 to 0.47). Conclusions and Relevance: As in previous phases of the study, visual acuity outcomes were highly variable with only 27 children (25%) achieving excellent visual acuity in their treated eye and 50 children (44%) having poor vision in the treated eye. Implanting an IOL at the time of cataract extraction was neither beneficial nor detrimental to the visual outcome.

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Lambert, S. R., Cotsonis, G., Dubois, L., Nizam, A., Kruger, S. J., Hartmann, E. E., … Drews-Botsch, C. (2020). Long-term Effect of Intraocular Lens vs Contact Lens Correction on Visual Acuity after Cataract Surgery during Infancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Ophthalmology, 138(4), 365–372. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2020.0006

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