Cross-stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast—new insight into an old phenomenon

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Abstract

Acquired stress resistance is the result of mild stress causing the acquisition of resistance to severe stress of the same or a different type. The mechanism of “same-stress” resistance (resistance to a second, strong stress after mild primary stress of the same type) probably depends on the activation of defense and repair mechanisms specific for a particular type of stress, while cross-stress resistance (i.e., resistance to a second, strong stress after a different type of mild primary stress) is the effect of activation of both a specific and general stress response program, which in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is known as the environmental stress response (ESR). Advancements in research techniques have made it possible to study the mechanism of cross-stress resistance at various levels of cellular organization: stress signal transduction pathways, regulation of gene expression, and transcription or translation processes. As a result of this type of research, views on the cross-stress protection mechanism have been reconsidered. It was originally thought that cross-stress resistance, irrespective of the nature of the two stresses, was determined by universal mechanisms, i.e., the same mechanisms within the general stress response. They are now believed to be more specific and strictly dependent on the features of the first stress.

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Święciło, A. (2016). Cross-stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast—new insight into an old phenomenon. Cell Stress and Chaperones, 21(2), 187–200. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12192-016-0667-7

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