The value of using measurements of geomagnetic field in addition to irradiance and sea surface temperature to estimate geolocations of tagged aquatic animals

6Citations
Citations of this article
50Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This article is free to access.

Abstract

In this commentary, we describe how geomagnetic intensity can be used to estimate latitude, discuss its strengths and weaknesses, and argue for its potential use along with irradiance measurements for estimating the latitude of a migratory fish carrying an archival tag. We conclude this commentary by suggesting that researchers and tag manufacturers estimate positions using as many inputs as possible, environmental irradiance, sea surface temperature, and geomagnetic field. Each environmental property will provide a better estimate of position at different times of the year and locations on earth. We contend that one geolocation estimation approach is not better than another, as each functions optimally under different circumstances and thus should be used accordingly.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Klimley, A. P., Flagg, M., Hammerschlag, N., & Hearn, A. (2017, September 2). The value of using measurements of geomagnetic field in addition to irradiance and sea surface temperature to estimate geolocations of tagged aquatic animals. Animal Biotelemetry. BioMed Central Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40317-017-0134-y

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free