Viscoelastic properties of tablets from Osborne solubility fraction, pentosans, flour and bread using relaxation tests

5Citations
Citations of this article
19Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text
This PDF is freely available from an open access repository. It may not have been peer-reviewed.

Abstract

There is no previously published data covering the viscoelasticity of Osborne protein solubility fractions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the viscoelastic properties of Osborne fractions, water soluble pentosans, flour and bread using relaxation tests. Sintered tablets from glutenins presented similar elasticity as gliadins but almost twice the viscosity. However, most of the wheat viscoelasticity performance in tablets was given by the sum of the non-gluten components (albumins, globulins, residue and especially water soluble pentosans). The residue was 86.1% w/w in flour and contained 4% protein while its estimated viscoelastic effect was higher compared to all the other flour components. Regarding the estimated viscosity in flour due to protein from specific fractions, it was higher in gliadins compared to glutenins. The residue although has low protein in flour (4.0%), the large amount of residue in flour had significant viscoelastic effect. The viscoelasticity of water soluble pentosans corrected by weight was similar to the Osborne protein fractions. The results indicate that the starch, pentosans, and non-gluten components may not be considered merely as inert filler and play a major role in determining the viscoelastic nature of flour and bread.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Figueroa-Cárdenas, J. de D., Escalante-Aburto, A., Véles-Medina, J. J., Hernández-Estrada, Z. J., Rayas-Duarte, P., Simsek, S., & Ponce-García, N. (2016). Viscoelastic properties of tablets from Osborne solubility fraction, pentosans, flour and bread using relaxation tests. Journal of Cereal Science, 69, 207–212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcs.2016.03.002

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free