Biomechanical analysis of a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of endplate for cervical disc replacement

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Abstract

Study Design: Biomechanical analysis of a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of end- plate was performed. Objective: To compare the biomechanical differences between a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate and the Prestige LP prosthesis after cervical disc replacement (CDR). Summary of Background Data: Artificial disc prostheses have been widely used to preserve the physiological function of treated and adjacent motion segments in CDR, while most of those present a flat surface instead of an arcuate surface which approximately similar to anatomic structures in vivo. We first reported a well-designed artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate. Methods: Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50N. Testing conditions were as follows: 1) intact, 2) C3-4 CDR with artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate, and 3) C3-4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis. The range of motion (ROM) and the pressures on the inferior surface of the two prostheses were recorded and analyzed. Results: As compared to the intact state, the ROM of all three segments had no significant difference in the replacement group. Additionally, there was no significant difference in ROM between the two prostheses. The mean pressure on the novel prosthesis was significantly less than the Prestige LP prosthesis. Conclusion: ROM in 3 groups (intact group, CDR group with novel prosthesis and CDR group with Prestige LP) showed no significant difference. The mean pressure on the inferior surface of the novel prosthesis was significantly lower than the Prestige LP prosthesis. Therefore, the novel artificial disc prosthesis is feasible and effective, and can reduce the implant-bone interface pressure on the endplate, which may be one possible reason of prosthesis subsidence.

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Yu, C. C., Hao, D. J., Huang, D. G., Qian, L. X., Feng, H., Li, H. K., & Zhao, S. C. (2016). Biomechanical analysis of a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of endplate for cervical disc replacement. PLoS ONE, 11(6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0158234

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