Acamprosate and baclofen were not effective in the treatment of pathological gambling: Preliminary blind rater comparison study

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Abstract

Objectives: Pathological gambling (PG) is a highly prevalent and disabling impulse control disorder. A range of psychopharmacological options are available for the treatment of PG, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioid receptor antagonists, anti-addiction drugs, and mood stabilizers. In our preliminary study, we examined the efficacy of two anti-addiction drugs, baclofen and acamprosate, in the treatment of PG. Materials and Methods: Seventeen male gamblers were randomly divided into two groups. Each group received one of the two drugs without being blind to treatment. All patients underwent a comprehensive psychiatric diagnostic evaluation and completed a series of semi-structured interviews. During the 6-months of study, monthly evaluations were carried out to assess improvement and relapses. Relapse was defined as recurrent gambling behavior. Results: None of the 17 patients reached the 6-months abstinence. One patient receiving baclofen sustained abstinence for 4 months. Fourteen patients succeeded in sustaining abstinence for 1-3 months. Two patients stopped attending monthly evaluations. Conclusion: Baclofen and acamprosate did not prove efficient in treating pathological gamblers. © 2011 Dannon, Rosenberg, Schoenfeld and Kotler.

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Dannon, P. N., Rosenberg, O., Schoenfeld, N., & Kotler, M. (2011). Acamprosate and baclofen were not effective in the treatment of pathological gambling: Preliminary blind rater comparison study. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 2(JUN). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2011.00033

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