Alcohol and Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications: Interactive Toxicity Beliefs Among People Living With HIV

41Citations
Citations of this article
27Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

When taken without interruption, antiretroviral therapies (ART) effectively treat HIV infection. Alcohol is a well-known direct and indirect influence on ART adherence. Believing that drinking is harmful while taking ART (interactive toxicity beliefs) is also associated with poor adherence. The current study included 333 people living with HIV who were taking ART and actively using alcohol. Participants were recruited from health care providers and social services in a major southern U.S. city. Results showed that 52% of persons found non-adherent to ART stated that they stopped taking their medications when they were drinking. Multivariate analyses showed that interrupting treatment when drinking was related to current non-adherence, over and above several common correlates of non-adherence including frequency of alcohol use itself. These results confirm and extend past research, indicating an urgent need for medication adherence interventions designed for people living with HIV who drink. © 2012 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Kalichman, S. C., Amaral, C. M., White, D., Swetsze, C., Kalichman, M. O., Cherry, C., & Eaton, L. (2012). Alcohol and Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications: Interactive Toxicity Beliefs Among People Living With HIV. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 23(6), 511–520. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jana.2011.11.005

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free