The association between the cross-sectional area of the dural sac and low back pain in a large population: The Wakayama Spine Study

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Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between the degree of encroachment, measured as the cross-sectional area of the dural sac, and low back pain in a large population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data from 802 participants (247 men, 555 women; mean age, 63.5 years) were analyzed. The measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural sac from the level of L1/2 to L4/5 was taken using axial T2-weighted images. The minimum cross-sectional area was defined as the cross-sectional area of the dural sac at the most constricted level in the examined spine. Participants were divided into three groups according to minimum cross-sectional area measurement quartiles (less than the first quartile, between the first and third quartiles, and greater than the third quartile). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between the minimum cross-sectional area and the prevalence of low back pain. Results: The mean minimum cross-sectional area was 117.3 mm2 (men: 114.4 mm2; women: 118.6 mm2). A logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and other confounding factors, including disc degeneration, showed that a narrow minimum cross-sectional area (smaller than the first quartile) was significantly associated with low back pain (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.80 compared to the wide minimum cross-sectional area group: minimum cross-sectional area greater than the third quartile measured). Conclusion: This study showed that a narrow dural sac cross-sectional area was significantly associated with the presence of low back pain after adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. Further investigations that include additional radiographic findings and psychological factors will continue to elucidate the causes of low back pain.

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Iwahashi, H., Yoshimura, N., Hashizume, H., Yamada, H., Oka, H., Matsudaira, K., … Yoshida, M. (2016). The association between the cross-sectional area of the dural sac and low back pain in a large population: The Wakayama Spine Study. PLoS ONE, 11(8). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0160002

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