Microbe-host interactions: Influence of the gut microbiota on the enteric nervous system

122Citations
Citations of this article
257Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This article is free to access.

Abstract

The enteric nervous system (ENS), considered a separate branch of the autonomic nervous system, is located throughout the length of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as a series of interconnected ganglionated plexi. Given the proximity of the intestinal microbiota to the ENS, it is perhaps not surprising that the gut microbiota can influence its development and function. However, these interactions are complex and may be either direct or indirect, often involving signalling initiated by microbe-derived components, metabolites or host-derived intermediaries which subsequently affect enteric nerve excitability and GI function. Individual microbes and strains can differentially influence ENS activity and neurochemistry. In this review we will briefly summarise the role of the microbiota on ENS development, and, in some more detail, explore the mechanisms by which the microbiota can influence ENS activity and function.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Hyland, N. P., & Cryan, J. F. (2016, September 15). Microbe-host interactions: Influence of the gut microbiota on the enteric nervous system. Developmental Biology. Academic Press Inc. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2016.06.027

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free