Effects of gendered racial microaggressions on the mental health of black women

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Abstract

This study aims to evaluate the effects of gendered racial microaggressions on the mental health of black women, specifically the influence of the variables identity and self-esteem on the relationship between the frequency of gendered racial microaggressions and mental health. 76 women participated in the study. The mean age was 24.62 years (SD = 6.3). Participants answered four instruments in addition to sociodemographic questions: Gendered Racial Microaggression Scale, Goldberg General Health Questionnaire, Group Identification Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The results indicate that the high frequency of gendered racial microaggressions predicts worse levels of mental health and self-esteem. Self-esteem mediates the relationship between microaggressions and general health. It is a protective factor of mental health. Identity moderates this relationship, so that a high identification as a black woman is related to lower levels of mental health when faced with a high frequency of discriminatory events. Despite some limitations, the objectives were achieved. Future studies should contribute with explanations of the relationship between gendered racial microaggressions and mental health.

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Martins, T. V., de Lima, T. J. S., & Santos, W. S. (2020). Effects of gendered racial microaggressions on the mental health of black women. Ciencia e Saude Coletiva, 25(7), 2793–2802. https://doi.org/10.1590/1413-81232020257.29182018

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