Public order transparency: Using freedom of information laws to analyse the policing of protest

  • Bruce D
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Abstract

This article discusses two research projects that have used the<br />Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA) to analyse protest in<br />South Africa and the policing thereof. A total of 23 information<br />requests were submitted on behalf of the two projects, 19 to the South<br />African Police Service ( SAPS) and four to the Independent Police<br />Investigative Directorate. The article starts by discussing police<br />transparency in South Africa, information on the policing of protest<br />that the SAPS routinely publishes in its annual report, the PAIA<br />framework, and some of the limitations of the projects. It then focuses<br />on insights into SAPS information on levels of protest and<br />protest-related violence in South Africa that emerged from the two<br />projects. This includes information disclosed by the police regarding<br />their use of force during protests, and police accountability for this.<br />The article concludes by reflecting on the implications of and lessons<br />from these exercises in police transparency.

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APA

Bruce, D. (2016). Public order transparency: Using freedom of information laws to analyse the policing of protest. SA Crime Quarterly, (58), 23–33. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2016/v0n58a1508

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