The Role of VEGF and KDR Polymorphisms in Moyamoya Disease and Collateral Revascularization

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Abstract

We conducted a case-control study to investigate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF -2578, -1154, -634, and 936) and kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR -604, 1192, and 1719) polymorphisms are associated with moyamoya disease. Korean patients with moyamoya disease (n = 107, mean age, 20.9±15.9 years; 66.4% female) and 243 healthy control subjects (mean age, 23.0±16.1 years; 56.8% female) were included. The subjects were divided into pediatric and adult groups. Among the 64 surgical patients, we evaluated collateral vessel formation after 2 years and divided patients into good (collateral grade A) or poor (collateral grade B and C) groups. The frequencies and distributions of four VEGF (-2578, -1154, -634, and 936) and KDR (-604, 1192, and 1719) polymorphisms were assessed from patients with moyamoya disease and compared to the control group. No differences were observed in VEGF -2578, -1154, -634, and 936 or KDR -604, 1192, and 1719 polymorphisms between the control group and moyamoya disease group. However, we found the -634CC genotype occurred less frequently in the pediatric moyamoya group (p = 0.040) whereas the KDR -604C/1192A/1719T haplotype increased the risk of pediatric moyamoya (p = 0.024). Patients with the CC genotype of VEGF -634 had better collateral vessel formation after surgery. Our results suggest that the VEGF -634G allele is associated with pediatric moyamoya disease and poor collateral vessel formation. © 2012 Park et al.

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Park, Y. S., Jeon, Y. J., Kim, H. S., Chae, K. Y., Oh, S. H., Han, I. B., … Kim, N. K. (2012). The Role of VEGF and KDR Polymorphisms in Moyamoya Disease and Collateral Revascularization. PLoS ONE, 7(10). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047158

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