The effect of technology on human social perception: A multi-methods neuroIS pilot investigation

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Abstract

Effects of digital communication have been reported, but with only little physiological data backing. The purpose of this pilot study was to use a multi-methods approach to investigate in digital natives the effects of reading from a mobile device, listening to an audio recording and listening to an actual person present, who reads out loud. Self-reported pleasantness and arousal as conscious data, startle reflex modulation, skin conductance and heart rate as non-conscious data were recorded for each condition. The findings indicate that physiological arousal measures tend to match respective self-report measures both indicating higher arousal levels for social conditions. However, physiological valence measures do not match their corresponding self-report measures. Listening to an audio recording and listening to a real person reading were rated as more pleasant than reading alone. However, listening to a present person reading out loud resulted in the most negative subcortical raw affective responses in digital native’s brains.

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Walla, P., & Lozovic, S. (2020). The effect of technology on human social perception: A multi-methods neuroIS pilot investigation. In Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation (Vol. 32, pp. 63–71). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28144-1_7

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