Chinese Immigrant Parents’ Involvement in their Children’s School Education: High Interest but Low Action

  • Zhong L
  • Zhou G
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Abstract

Using interview as the primary data collection method, this qualitative study examined how Chinese immigrant parents are involved in their children’s school education and what factors shape the formats of their involvement. Twelve Chinese immigrant families participated in this study. Data analysis reveals that Chinese parents got involved in their children’s school education regardless of personal experiences. They expressed beliefs that parental involvement is beneficial to both the school and children. However, generally speaking, participants did not go to their children’s school without teachers’ invitation. Language barrier, lack of time and energy, and unfamiliarity with the Canadian school culture were stated as the main reasons that contributed to participants’ limited involvement in school activities. Particularly, new immigrants often feel intimidated to talk to teachers since they do not know what they can say and what not given their unfamiliarity with the Canadian school culture. 

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Zhong, L., & Zhou, G. (2017). Chinese Immigrant Parents’ Involvement in their Children’s School Education: High Interest but Low Action. Brock Education Journal, 20(2). https://doi.org/10.26522/brocked.v20i2.167

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