Malignant hyperthermia: A runaway thermogenic futile cycle at the sodium channel level

  • Williams C
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
5Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Malignant Hyperthermia (“MH”)—the rapid onset of extremely high fever with muscle rigidity—is caused by a runaway heat production futile cycle mediated via the sodium channels at the myoneural receptor sites. MH is not triggered by non-depolarizing muscle relaxants; however, depolarizing muscle relaxants may trigger it [1]. Here we present a de novo hypothesis of how MH is triggered and develops. We believe that the acetylcholine receptor/sodium channels in the muscles of MH susceptible pigs initiate MH by allowing an increased flux of sodium ions when it is depolarized by acetylcholine or other depolarizing agents, such as succinylcholine and Halothane. Our theory is consistent with our observations of the effects of general anesthetics over twenty years. Succinylcholine is a depolarizing agent that is a potent MH trigger.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Williams, C. H. (2014). Malignant hyperthermia: A runaway thermogenic futile cycle at the sodium channel level. Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, 05(03), 197–200. https://doi.org/10.4236/abb.2014.53025

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free