Are Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)/Dyspraxia and/or Joint Hypermobility Syndrome inherent determinants of physical inactivity

  • Clark C
  • Khattab A
  • Carr E
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
7Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Background: The annual health burden of physical inac-tivity in the UK is estimated to be £1.06 billion. The World Health Organisation recommendations are for adults to be engaged in moderate intensity physical activity for at least half an hour a day on five days a week. It is possible that there are inherent conditions which influence physical activ-ity participation. Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)/Dyspraxia are noted to be less physically active than their peers. DCD/Dyspraxia is a neurodevelop-mental disorder affecting motor function and organisation; continues into adulthood and associated with Joint Hyper-mobility Syndrome (JHS). JHS is a multisystemic disorder characterised by chronic pain, musculoskeletal and auto-nomic symptoms and fatigue. Purpose: To explore factors which may affect time spent engaged in weekly physical activity in adults with JHS com-pared with healthy volunteers (HVs). Methods: 90 patients with JHS (mean age 34.7 ± 9.9 years, 83 female), diagnosed by a consultant Rheumatologist according to the Brighton Criteria were compared with 113 HVs with no musculoskeletal pain (mean age 35.7 ± 12.9, 82 female). Information relating to types of physical activity, time spent engaged in physical activity, and common symp-toms associated with JHS (Pain, chronic fatigue, autonomic symptoms, DCD/Dyspraxia) were collected using self-report questionnaires (Functional Difficulties Questionnaire, Phys-ical Activity Questionnaire) and pain chart. Numerical data were analysed using chi square and logistic regression anal-ysis. Results: Walking was the commonest type of physical activity reported (62% HV and 63% Patients with JHS). There was no significant difference in the time spent engaged in physical activity for more than 3 hours a week between Patients with JHS (57%) and HV (66%) chi square 1.75 [95% CI 1.04–4.15] p = 0.187. The odds of patients with JHS with-out DCD/Dyspraxia (70%) being engaged in physical activity for more than 3 hours compared with patients with JHS and DCD/Dyspraxia (47%) were 2.64 [95%CI 1.1–6.4] greater. Both Patients with JHS and HV without DCD/Dyspraxia were 3 times [95%CI 1.43–5.55] more likely to be engaged in physical activity for 3 hours or more a week than patients with JHS and HV with DCD/Dyspraxia. These results indicated that DCD/Dyspraxia was a statistically significant predic-tor of reduced physical activity in both populations. Logistic regression revealed that age, sex, pain, chronic fatigue and autonomic symptoms were not statistically significantly asso-ciated with reduced physical activity in either the patient with JHS or HV groups. Conclusion(s): This is the first study to report the asso-ciation between DCD/Dyspraxia in adults with reduced time spent engaged in weekly physical activity. There was no sig-nificant association of symptoms that might be expected to impact on physical activity participation for example pain, chronic fatigue and autonomic symptoms. Implications: Physical inactivity is a significant burden globally and is the fourth leading risk factor for mortality as one of the major determinants of non-communicable dis-ease (NCD). This study indicates that DCD/Dyspraxia may be a contributor to physical inactivity. The small numbers in this study preclude any generalizability and larger epidemi-ological studies are required to explore this association more thoroughly.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Clark, C. J., Khattab, A., & Carr, E. C. J. (2015). Are Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)/Dyspraxia and/or Joint Hypermobility Syndrome inherent determinants of physical inactivity. Physiotherapy, 101, e254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.436

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free