Differences in F9 and 5.51 cell elasticity determined by cell poking and atomic force microscopy

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Abstract

We studied the elasticity of both a wild type (F9) mouse embryonic carcinoma and a vinculin-deficient (5.51) cell line, which was produced by chemical mutagenesis. Using cell poking, we measured the effects of loss of vinculin on the elastic properties of these cells. F9 cells mere about 20% more resistant to indentation by the cell poker (a glass stylus) than were 5.51 cells. Using the atomic force microscope to map the elasticity of wild type and vinculin-deficient cells by 128 x 128 force scans, we observed a correlation of elasticity with cell poking elastometric measurements. These findings, as well as previous atomic force, rheologic, and magnetometric measurements [Goldmann and Ezzell, Exp. Cell Res. 226 (1996) 233-237; Ezzell et al., Exp. Cell Res. 231 (1997) 14-26], indicate that vinculin is an integral part of the cytoskeletal network.

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Goldmann, W. H., Galneder, R., Ludwig, M., Kromm, A., & Ezzell, R. M. (1998). Differences in F9 and 5.51 cell elasticity determined by cell poking and atomic force microscopy. FEBS Letters, 424(3), 139–142. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0014-5793(98)00155-0

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