Distinct regulation of transmitter release at the drosophila NMJ by different isoforms of nemy

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Abstract

© 2015 Knight et al. Synaptic transmission is highly plastic and subject to regulation by a wide variety of neuromodulators and neuropeptides. In the present study, we have examined the role of isoforms of the cytochrome b561 homologue called no extended memory (nemy) in regulation of synaptic strength and plasticity at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of third instar larvae in Drosophila. Specifically, we generated two independent excisions of nemy that differentially affect the expression of nemy isoforms. We show that the nemy < sup > 45 < /sup > excision, which specifically reduces the expression of the longest splice form of nemy, leads to an increase in stimulus evoked transmitter release and altered synaptic plasticity at the NMJ. Conversely, the nemy < sup > 26.2 < /sup > excision, which appears to reduce the expression of all splice forms except the longest splice isoform, shows a reduction in stimulus evoked transmitter release, and enhanced synaptic plasticity. We further show that nemy < sup > 45 < /sup > mutants have reduced levels of amidated peptides similar to that observed in peptidyl-glycine hydryoxylating mono-oxygenase (PHM) mutants. In contrast, nemy < sup > 26.2 < /sup > mutants show no defects in peptide amidation but rather display a decrease in Tyramine β hydroxylase activity (TβH). Taken together, these results show non-redundant roles for the different nemy isoforms and shed light on the complex regulation of neuromodulators. Copyright:

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Knight, D., Iliadi, K. G., Iliadi, N., Wilk, R., Hu, J., Krause, H. M., … Boulianne, G. L. (2015). Distinct regulation of transmitter release at the drosophila NMJ by different isoforms of nemy. PLoS ONE, 10(8). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0132548

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